LensWork Extended #113

LensWork and LensWork Extended are two of my favorite magazines. LensWork is a text publication that comes out in alternate months, and LensWork Extended is a DVD-based version that comes out in the off-months (there’s also a download-only version). LensWork itself comes an essay or two, an interview, and a number of black & white portfolios. LensWork Extended adds a few portfolios, including some in color, and includes audio interviews with many of the photographers. It’s hard for me to say which aspect of LensWork I enjoy the most- the paper photos are exquisitely printed, the digital portfolios look great on my iPad, and the interviews are always interesting and insightful.

LensWork Extended 113 contained a number of interesting portfolios. Here is a brief description of my favorites, along with a link to the photographers’s online portfolio. If you like what you see, visit the LensWork.com website.


Wayne Lambert’s Mexico Profundo covers what he calls “Deep Mexico”. This is the rural, primitive areas of Mexico, not the tourist attractions. He started the project in the late 60’s and early 70’s, while the culture still remained intact. The portfolio contains a spectrum of landscapes, building interiors, and intimate portraits.


Water by Hans Strand by Hans Strand forces on “the many personalities of water in liquid form.” This ranges from waterfalls to quiet lakes, ocean tides to dew drops. Spray, waterfalls, quiet lakes, roaring ocean waves, and quiet ripples in a lake. I’m always a sucker for a good waterfall shot, and there is that and more in this portfolio.


More Than a Rock is a color portfolio by Guy Tal, a new regular contributor to LensWork. He aims to shoot images that take a deeper look at a subject.
…something subjective, originating from the unique mind of the photographer that would not have existed had they not created it
While I struggle to summarize his Artist’s Statement, the portfolio itself is immediately approachable and beautiful. It’s not always easy to find fresh ideas in the landscape genre, but Guy succeeds admirably.